No Stopping Saturday

No Stopping Saturday

“Well, this is not how the city normally is,” Dr. Reilly explains. “Don’t get me wrong, I like Thunder and all the rest of the Derby events, but… Let’s just say we collectively lose our minds at this time of year. My fear is you’re going to get an erroneous first impression of Louisville.”

Ehrichto had been surprised to find the downtown area being set up for a crowd, city workers re-arranging sawhorses to block off certain lanes to traffic, and police milling about on foot, their cruisers parked haphazardly across otherwise deserted intersections. From signs posted in shop windows he’d figured out that “Thunder Over Louisville” began with an air show at 2pm and culminated after dark with a sizeable display of fireworks.

“Oh, don’t worry, this isn’t the first time I’ve been to Louisville,” he assures the doctor. “My family is from here, actually. But, now, it is the first I’ve been in town for this ‘Thunder’. I gather it’s quite a big deal?”

The doctor chuckles. “It’s only the biggest annual fireworks show in North America. Is that a big enough deal for you?”

Quarry: Resurrection by N. S. Beranek

Calm before the storm.

KCA with Hollenbachs I took this

The Thunder Over Louisville hype is not what brought Ehrichto to the hotel. He’d been stopped in his tracks by the sight that greeted him at Fifth and Main. For a moment he’d wondered if he was somehow on the wrong block, or if maybe they’d re-numbered the streets, any explanation at all besides the obvious and unthinkable, that they’d torn down the Conway Distillery building. But they had. All the buildings on that block were gone, replaced by an angular structure of light brown brick and soaring green glass capped by a rounded, corrugated steel roof. The building looked for all the world like a giant soup can laid on its side.

He was standing, staring at it in horror when a voice to his left said, “I know, right? It’s the only decent block in the whole damned city. I so cannot wait to get to Man-hattan.”

Link for ordering Saints and Sinners 2015: New Fiction from the Festival.

Order here: http://www.boldstrokesbooks.com/9781626393912e.html

SAS Anthology Scaled 2

In alphabetical order by author’s last name, the 2015 Saints and Sinners Short Fiction Contest finalists are:

“Gingerbread” by Eric Andrew-Katz

“Days of Awe” by N.S. Beranek

“Basketball Fever” by Maureen Brady (Winner)

“Wrens Knell” by Kristyn Dunnion

“Pageant Girl” by Sam Hawk

“Fat Hands” by John Kane (Runner-up)

“Maple Beach People” by Lee Lynch

“Hustlers Court” by Frank Perez (Runner-up)

“A Perfect Fit” by Felice Picano

“‘Til it Bleeds” by Jerry Rabushka

“Femorph” by James Russell

“What it was Turned Ollie Queer” by Mike Tuohy

This year’s entries were stronger than ever and the judges found the selection process difficult. With that in mind, for the first time we are also announcing a list of Honorable Mentions. The judges found these stories to be very strong contenders and while they are not being included in the 2015 anthology, we wanted to acknowledge them.

The Saints and Sinners 2015 Short Fiction Honorable Mentions are, in alphabetical order by authors last name:

Tom Baker for “Arianna”

Rich Barnett for “White Paint”

Elaine Burnes for “Auto Repair”

J.R. Greenwell for “A Tongue and a Twerk”

Angel Propps for “Carnations”

Vince Sgambati for “Vera’s Place”

Kacie Stetson for “Nganga”

Karis Walsh for “Transport”

 Order here: http://www.boldstrokesbooks.com/9781626393912e.html

Death By The Riverside

“Death by the Riverside” by J.M. Redmann. (Bold Strokes Books, 2009.)

This is the first of the Micky Knight Mystery series. Based on the blurb, I had an inkling I would like it. It turns out I was wrong. I didn’t like it; I loved it.

Right from the get-go, the story was hilarious. Micky is a great character: sarcastic, sharp-eyed, keen of mind, and always, always cool. She’s flawed, very human, and therefore relatable. She’s wounded yet she’s also kind, deserving of a happiness that’s always just out of reach, which of course makes her sympathetic. Beyond her perspective, the author knew exactly which elements would make the story a terrific in-joke without going too far (a bar called Gertrude’s Stein made me laugh out loud), the plot kept me guessing, and plenty of action ensured things stayed lively.

The balance of dialogue to exposition (written in the character’s appealing, ironic tone) was perfect, something I noticed because I’d just read a book where that was not the case, written by someone who should know better, and the result was wooden, recurring, soap opera-type dialogue, as jarring as an out-of-tune instrument. By contrast, there wasn’t a word of this book that struck a wrong note.

One final thought. This story is heavy on what’s termed “gay agenda”. That’ll no doubt put some people off, but it’s one of the things I liked best about it. Similar to the way that someone who likes vampire stories never wearies of hearing a new one, I’m always going to want to read narratives in which a person persecuted for being gay not only survives the abuse but triumphs.This one was great, and I can’t wait to read the next installment.